Far into the Arctic Norway we find, Annbjørg a musher in her mid-20s passionate about dog sledding preparing for Finnmarksløpet.
With skiing in Norwegian territory being documented all the way back to 5200 BCE, it is no surprise that the wooden planks benteah our feet has become a symbol of Norwegian culture. Every year, millions of Norwegians visit the mountains, strapping the narrow planks to their feet and heading out to the wilderness for some peace and quiet.
Resting on a cliff, 45 metres above sea level Kråkenes Fyr guides Norwegian fishermen and oilers to shore. For over a century, this lighthouse has been our seafarer’s first sign of home after weeks on the sea. Now, this is an astonishing accommodation for extreme weather enthusiasts.
Every autumn, when the days get darker and darker, a special type of photographers wake up from their summer hibernation. Join us on a hunt for the aurora borealis, the northern lights dancing in the Arctic sky.
Outside of Stavanger, Norway we find an unusual coastline in Norwegian scale. Instead of rocky shores, bergs and boulder reefs Jæren is a place with long sandy beaches, perfect for small ventures on the waves.
The west coast capital of Norway, Bergen is a city surrounded by mountains. One of these mountains is Fløyen, the popular hiking desitnation every Bergenser "citizen of Bergen" has to experience once or twice.
50 kilometres from the nearest village, only accessible by boat or foot, one of Northern Europe's mightiest waterfalls is hidden. Standing 269 metres tall, the Mollisfossen Waterfall is the Arctic's tallest waterfall and a spectacular sight.
Just 30 minutes from the heart of Oslo you find Nordmarka, a wilderness area with plenty of fishing waters, hiking trails, ski routes, and cabins. In the summer marked trials guide you to dozens of viewpoints, campsites and fishing spots.
We are two guys who brought our surfboards, turned off our cellphones, and walked out here in September 2019.